Collection Online
Medium
silver, wood, fabric
Measurements
(a-b) 32.1 × 13.6 × 13.6 cm (overall)
(c-d) 32.4 × 13.7 × 13.6 cm (overall)
(e-f) 32.4 × 13.6 × 13.6 cm (overall)
(g-h) 32.2 × 13.5 × 13.6 cm (overall)
Place/s of Execution
London, England
Inscription
(a) punched (vertically) in rear above rim of base l.c.: WA
punched in rear above rim of base l.c.: (lion passant) (crowned leopard's head) O
(c) punched (vertically) in left side above rim of base l.c.: W
punched in left side above rim of base l.c.: (lion passant) (crowned leopard's head) O
(e) punched (vertically) in right side l.c.: Wa
punched in right side l.c.: (lion passant) (crowned leopard's head) O
(g) punched (vertically) in left side l.c.: Wa
punched in left side l.c.: (lion passant) (crowned leopard's head) O
Accession Number
3291.a-h-D3
Department
International Decorative Arts
Credit Line
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Felton Bequest, 1932
Gallery location
18th Century Decorative Arts - Great Hall Costume Corridor
Level 2, NGV International
Through his claims that forms in architecture could be related to the size and proportions of the human body, the writings of Roman architect Vitruvius exerted an enormous influence during the Renaissance. The role of the column was critical, as the column shaft and capital were equated with the body and head and from its proportions and type – Doric, Ionic or Corinthian, all other aspects of a building followed. In Classical architecture, each column type formed part of an order of decoration and proportion, thus forming a language of proportions, translated here to a domestic scale in these candlesticks.