Collection Online

Fight between the ship of the line, Jupiter and the French frigate, Preneuse, in the neighbourhood of Madagascar 11th October, 1799
1876

Medium
oil on canvas
Measurements
138.6 × 220.3 cm
Inscription
inscribed in red paint l.l.: J. Bennetter. (underlined)
inscribed in red paint l.r.: 17/3 1876 (underlined)
Accession Number
p.310.7-1
Department
International Painting
Credit Line
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Purchased, 1884
This digital record has been made available on NGV Collection Online through the generous support of Digitisation Champion Ms Carol Grigor through Metal Manufactures Limited
Gallery location
19th Century European Paintings Gallery
Level 2, NGV International
Provenance

Exhibited Fletcher's Art Gallery, Melbourne, 1884; possibly with Koekkoek & Sons (dealer), Melbourne, 1884; from where purchased for the NGV, 1884.



Exhibited Fletcher’s Art Gallery, Melbourne, 1884.

This painting depicts a skirmish between two powerful frigates towards the end of the French Revolutionary Wars. On October 10 1799, the Jupiter, (on the left) considered one of the fastest ships in the Royal Navy, pursued the powerful Preneuse and caught up with it the next day. The rough seas, captured well here by Bennetter, apparently rendered the large canons on the lower deck of the Jupiter inoperable, considerably reducing its fire power. Both ships exchanged canon fire and suffered great but not fatal damage. The quicker Jupiter retired from the battle and the captain of the Preneuse chose not to pursue the British ship. Not sinking or capturing the French ship was considered by the Admiralty to be a slightly embarrassing failure.

Frame

Johan BENNETTER
Fight between the ship of the line, Jupiter and the French frigate, Preneuse, in the neighbourhood of Madagascar 11th October, 1799 1876
Framemaker
Unknown - 19th century
Date
c.1876
Johan BENNETTER
Fight between the ship of the line, Jupiter and the French frigate, Preneuse, in the neighbourhood of Madagascar 11th October, 1799 1876
About

This fluted scotia, classical revival frame is believed to be the frame in which the painting was acquired in 1884. Despite having tie bolts across the corners suggesting it should come apart, the acanthus corner ornaments appear now to be adhered across the mitred join. In other instances these sections are attached with small screws to facilitate diss-assembly.
The fluted scotia frame emerges in the late eighteenth century and has wide use through the nineteenth century and into the twentieth.
It stems from the revival of classicism and stands in contrast to dominant Baroque and Rococo frame forms.