Collection Online

Madame Melba
(c. 1902)

Artist/s name
Medium
oil on canvas
Measurements
245.5 x 153.0 cm
Place/s of Execution
London, England
Accession Number
A70-1980
Department
Australian Painting
Credit Line
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Purchased through The Art Foundation of Victoria with the assistance of Dinah and Henry Krongold CBE, Founder Benefactors, 1980
This digital record has been made available on NGV Collection Online through the generous support of The Vizard Foundation
Gallery location
Not on display

Colourmen

Colourman
FOINET FILS & LEFEBVRE
Location
Reverse of canvas
Transcription
TOILES & COULEURS/EXTRA-FINES/P.FOINET Fils & LEFEBVRE/PARIS/54 R NOTRE-DAME-DES CHAMPS
Medium
Ink stencil
More information
National Portrait Gallery
Guide Labreuche (FR)

Frame

Rupert BUNNY
Madame Melba (c. 1902)
Framemaker
R. J. Stannard
30 Great Russell Street,
London W.C.
Date
(1902)
Materials

The frame is made up of composition ornament on a wooden chassis. The corners are secured with large screws in the manner of frames which are intended to be taken apart, though here the ornaments across the face of the mitres are bonded to the substrate. Little evidence remains of the original finish, though it was more than likely gilded with a mixture of matte and burnished surfaces.

Condition

Losses in the composition ornaments have been replaced at various times. The ornament of the inner scotia is not well adhered. The surface has been over-painted with gold coloured paint throughout.

Dimensions
270.0 x 178.5 x 14.0 cm; sight 241.0 x 150.0 cm
More information
National Portrait Gallery
Rupert BUNNY
Madame Melba (c. 1902) Rupert BUNNY
Madame Melba (c. 1902) (colourman)
About

The frame is in the manner of those used by Thomas Lawrence, which would seem to be appropriate to the formality and grandeur of the portrait. The painting was shown at the Royal Academy, London, 1902. Despite having been resurfaced, the frame is a fine example of the large formal portrait frames from the early decades of the nineteenth century being reproduced at the beginning of the twentieth century. Framing styles are often revisited long after their date of introduction in order to develop our response to paintings through the association of the frame.