Collection Online

The Chinese shawl
(1912)

Artist/s name
Medium
oil on canvas
Measurements
117.8 x 90.1 cm
Accession Number
1284-3
Credit Line
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Felton Bequest, 1923
Gallery location
Not on display

Colourmen

Colourman
CHENIL
Location
Lower half of canvas reverse
Transcription
CHENIL/BY THE/TOWNHALL/CHELSEA within a palette form
Medium
Ink stencil
More information
National Portrait Gallery

Frame

William ORPEN
The Chinese shawl (1912)
Framemaker
Daniel Egan
26 Lower Ormond Quay,
Dublin
Date
(1912)
Materials

The basic construction of the frame is a wooden profile with discrete runs of composition ornament. As with many frames in this form, the working edge is formed by the addition of a wooden strip forming a shelf for a run of composition decoration, in this case shield and dart. Here, however, the back edge has been extended with an extra level of timber and in a corresponding way there is a second slip, painted black, which steps the painting back in the frame and leaves a sight edge which is articulated by shadow. The top member of the frame proper has a mitred join across the whole section, but this may be more representative of the original construction than evidence of having been cut down. It is only noted in this one section. The upper left and lower right corners are, nevertheless, sufficiently disturbed to suggest the frame has been cut down at these two joins. The extra depth at the back and the sight edge seem to confirm a major interference with the original form.

Condition

It is likely the frame has been re-gilded.

Dimensions
145.0 x 117.0 x 12.0 cm; sight 117.0 x 89.2 cm
William ORPEN
The Chinese shawl (1912) William ORPEN
The Chinese shawl (1912) (colourman stamp) William ORPEN
The Chinese shawl (1912) (colourman stamp)
About

The frame is labelled on the centre bottom reverse by Daniel Egan but carries a further label on the centre of the right side for Chapman Bros. It is likely the frame was originally made by Egan then recycled in a cut-down and deepened form by Chapman Bros., leaving us to wonder whether these choices were those of the painter or another party.