Collection Online

A Sheikh and his son entering Cairo on their return from a pilgrimage to Mecca
1874

Medium
oil on canvas
Measurements
139.3 × 244.5 cm
Place/s of Execution
London, England
Inscription
inscribed in red paint l.l.: RDOWLING / -1874
inscribed in brown paint on reverse: No.1 /
"A Sheikh and his Son / Entering Cairo on his their
(his crossed out) / return from a pilgrimage / to Mecca" / By Robert Dowling / 27 Colaherne Road / West Brompton /
1875
Accession Number
p.306.7-1
Department
Australian Painting
Credit Line
National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne
Presented by a committee of gentlemen, 1878
This digital record has been made available on NGV Collection Online through the generous support of The Vizard Foundation
Gallery location
Not on display

Colourmen

Colourman
WILLIAM BENHAM
Location
on stretcher bar vertical brace
Transcription
DEPOT OF THE LIBRARY COMPANY LIMITED/WILLIAM BENHAM/ARTISTS' COLOURMAN & STATIONER/Print Seller & Picture Frame Maker/ENGRAVER, DIE SINKER & EMBOSSER/9 Devonshire Terrace Notting Hill./DRAWINGS LENT TO COPY W./Maps, Prints & Drawings mounted & varnished
Medium
Paper label
More information
National Portrait Gallery

Colourmen

Colourman
WINSOR & NEWTON
Location
Twice, at centre and right of reverse of canvas
Transcription
PREPARED BY/WINSOR & NEWTON/38, RATHBONE PLACE,/LONDON.
Medium
Ink stamp
More information
National Portrait Gallery

Frame

Robert DOWLING
A Sheikh and his son entering Cairo on their return from a pilgrimage to Mecca 1874
Framemaker
Unknown - 19th century
Date
c.1874
Materials

timber, composition and gold leaf

Condition

Good original condition

About

The frame on A Sheikh and his son entering Cairo on their return from a pilgrimage to Mecca is contemporary with the painting, which was presented by a committee of gentlemen in 1878, four years after it was painted.
It is possible the frame was made by William Benham, whose label noting frame making activities appears on the stretcher, but he may equally have been a supplier of the stretched canvas and is more known as an artist colourman.
The painting was shown at the Royal Academy London in 1875 and it is likely it was shown in this frame. It travelled to Launceston, Tasmania in 1877 and then to the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

The frame is reminiscent of the Vokins frame built for Edwin Long’s painting, Queen Ester, from 1878, making use of composition ornament to link the decoration of the frame with the subject and detail of the painting.