Thousands of Victorian primary and secondary school students are among NGV visitors excited by the current Melbourne Winter Masterpieces exhibition Monet’s Garden: The Musée Marmottan Monet, Paris.

In programs at the Gallery, and in classrooms around the state, Monet’s work is inspiring insightful discussions and writing, and some very creative art making projects.

After visiting the exhibition, a group of Grade 5 students sat down in the Great Hall of the NGV and reflected on what they had seen.  Alexandra wrote ‘I love the way Monet uses different layers.  The way he will paint the tree fifty different shades of green instead of two.  I also like the way he makes the strokes bold and easily seen’.  Her friend Tara ‘noticed that Claude Monet paintings tend to vary from ocean landscapes to willow trees…but I observed that the majority of Monet’s paintings show that he is thoroughly obsessed with water.  I also love the way he layers his paintings up and uses many different tones and shades’.   Evie commented that even though she sometimes gets ‘slightly bored’ on excursions ‘Monet makes me want to stay for hours and hours.  I don’t want to leave’.

How have your students responded to Monet’s Garden?   What did they learn about Monet from the exhibition?  Was there something about Monet’s work that surprised them?  Did your students have a favourite work, and what was it that appealed to them about this work?

Be part of the Inspired by Monet – Junior Critics forum by sharing your student’s responses in the comments box below.  Responses from students of all year levels, and up to 250 words per student, are welcome.

Please tell us the first name and year level of each student whose writing is sent in, and the school.  Please also let your students know that you are submitting their work for publication. Individual students are also welcome to submit their responses.

For students who would like to learn more about writing like a critic visit:

Write like a critic for older students 

Write like a critic for younger students

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