Teacher notes

This resource has been designed to support school and gallery-based learning for the exhibition Bark Ladies: Eleven artists from Yirrkala.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify and discuss how ideas are expressed in artworks
  • Compare and contrast some of the traditional and new techniques used by Yolŋu artists
  • Analyse and interpret how artists in Bark Ladies: Eleven artists from Yirrkala use materials, techniques, technologies and processes to realise their intentions in their art
  • Examine how the concept of Country is explored in selected works from Bark Ladies: Eleven artists from Yirrkala and consider the connection between Country and identity for Yolŋu people

Links to the Victorian Curriculum

Notes

  1. Ringimi gapu is a concept that roughly translates as ‘river of Heaven and Earth’.
  2. Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, ‘Yolŋu Culture’, Dhimurru Aboriginal Corporation, http://www.dhimurru.com.au/yolngu-culture.html, accessed 6 Oct. 2021
  3. Judith Ryan, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art in the collection of the National Gallery of Victoria, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2015, p.78
  4. Maŋgalili is a clan of the Yirrkala region. For more information on clans in this region visit https://yirrkala.com/category/clan/
  5. Myles Russell-Cook ‘Bark Ladies: Eleven Artists from Yirrkala’ Bark Ladies: Eleven Artists from Yirrkala, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2021, p.5
  6. Maia Nuku, Evelyn A.J. Hall & John A Friede, ‘Garak I, 2009’, 2019 Met Museum, https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/822576, accessed 14 Sep. 2021.
  7. Myles Russell-Cook, Bark Ladies: Eleven Artists from Yirrkala, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2021, p.10
  8. Biennale of Sydney Art, ‘Noŋgirrŋa Marawili’ Biennale of Sydney Art https://www.biennaleofsydney.art/artists/no%C5%8Bgirr%C5%8Ba-marawili/, accessed 14 Sep. 2021.
  9. Myles Russell-Cook, Bark Ladies: Eleven Artists from Yirrkala, National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 2021, p.10